Commentary: Justice, disaster work intersect

Few of us would consider disasters to be linked to justice work because disasters don’t discriminate… or do they? It is true that many natural disasters impact rich and poor, black and white … but the reality is that impoverished and low-income communities are more susceptible to disasters than others. Because of systemic injustices, they are more vulnerable, explains UCC Disaster Ministries Executive Zach Wolgemuth in this commentary.  

Few of us would consider disasters to be linked to justice work because disasters don’t discriminate… or do they? It is true that many natural disasters impact rich and poor; young and old; black and white; educated and uneducated; insured and uninsured; employed and unemployed, but the reality is that certain communities are more susceptible to disasters than others. Because of systemic injustices, they are more vulnerable.  Click here to read UCC Disaster Ministries Executive Zach Wolgemuth’s commentary.

Categories: Disaster Updates

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