A wholeness approach – walking with displaced Sudanese

South Sudan has been facing their most recent violence since a political power struggle erupted in mid-December of 2013.   The United Nations estimates that the conflict has displaced 1.5 million internally and another 500,000 have sought refuge in neighboring countries.

South Sudan has been facing their most recent violence since a political power struggle erupted in mid-December of 2013. The United Nations estimates that the conflict has displaced 1.5 million internally and another 500,000 have sought refuge in neighboring countries.Capture.PNG

Political negotiations to settle the conflict continued throughout 2014, which led to a cessation in hostilities in January 2015. Despite the signing of a peace agreement on the establishment of a Transitional Government of National Unity, each of the warring parties has since accused the other party of not adhering to clauses of the agreement, thus raising concerns if sustainable peace, security and stability will be achieved anytime soon. World leaders, UN Envoys, and diplomats have voiced the need to adopt durable solutions to end this crisis with a demand for a total stop of violence and for sustainable peace. 

Even if the political situation stabilized, the humanitarian impact would still be felt for years.  South Sudanese people, therefore, also are fleeing to neighboring countries, including Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia.  Women and children are most of the new refugees and are pouring into Uganda at the rate of 124 a day.   The United Church of Christ is part of the global reach of church humanitarian organizations that provide significant support for refugees in Uganda, including kits of soap, sleeping mats, blanket, cups, plates, and sleeping mosquito nets; sustainable livelihoods and psycho-social support after the trauma of the war; as well as programs for peace and conflict resolution.  All of these are part of the “Adjumani Refugees’ Initiative for Self-Reliance and Empowerment (ARISE).” 

mingkamanbeds.jpgThe violence that has displaced people within the borders of the new nation is causing increasing food insecurity and health care crises.  The global church organization, IMA World Health, supports local churches in South Sudan and helps strengthen the national health system.  When other organizations departed South Sudan because of the violence, IMA World Health chose to remain.  Sudanese health workers with IMA World Health have remained with their patients and have committed to rebuilding the health facilities destroyed by violence.  The local and internally displaced people (IDP) in Mingkaman, South Sudan receive preventative, emergency, and sexual & reproductive health services in such a rebuilt outreach clinic managed through IMA World Health.  The United Church of Christ is a member of IMA World Health.

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Happy Birthday to this infant in South Sudan. Read the story from IMA World Health about the services they are proving at their clinic in Mingkaman.

 

 

 

Sign this petition urging the U.S. Secretary of State and the U.S. Representative to the United Nations to continue putting heavy pressure on the two sides of this South Sudan civil war to implement the term of the 2015 peace agreement both leaders signed.   

Your participation in the One Great Hour of Sharing (UCC) all church offering and Special Funds deepen the impact of the global church in support of uprooted peoples in South Sudan.

Categories: Refugee Emergency Updates

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