United Church of Christ

Books of the Bible: Revelation

Good news isn’t so good when it leaves us unequipped to deal with what’s at hand. We are much better served by people who see the depth of our dilemmas and give us candid notice.


Before you begin resoluting, remind yourself of this very important point: It is not your job to save the whole world; Somebody Else has already made that resolution.


We do our best when we kneel to no god but God alone, to lean not on our own feet but on the power of the One who calls us to humble supplication in the first place.

 


Jesus’ coming is not what many people imagine. ‘Come, Lord Jesus’ is nothing short of a plea for the renewal of humanity, an indictment of the distinctions we have made ultimate.


Is God’s grace for you? For us? Could it be for all? It’s not something we can earn by opening our commentaries, or learning Greek, or getting it right. It’s a gift freely given.


Revelation does not reveal the future. Revelation reveals us—exposes our privilege and proximity to power and, by God, offers a way out.


We often read the Bible as if it’s addressed only to individuals. Except it mostly isn’t. How does it change our understanding to know that Scripture’s words are not for us alone?


If you scream at somebody often enough in the name of religion, they just might decide it sounds better to be whatever it is you've been calling them than whatever it is you call yourself.


The church is not perfect. Our messes are often on grand display. But there's something about the sweaty realness of Here that is preparation for There—for God's envisioned kin-dom.


We do not need a structure and a steeple to be the Church today. We are the embodiment of God's purpose, promise and power at work in the world.