United Church of Christ

Books of the Bible: Matthew

Viewing the planet as personal property to be divvied up among the worthy runs counter to the ‘earth-honoring faith’ that we need in our environmentally perilous time.


Be grateful if you’ve been on the receiving end of selflessness, but don’t regard the service of others as their duty and your right.


Headlines full of over-the-top violent imagery agitate our inflamed emotions and rub the raw places in our spirits. Be mindful of where they lead, and remember Who you follow.


That new, shiny thing? We can delight in it for a time, but it will lose its luster. And then we look for the next hit. God calls us to shape our lives around greater gifts.


The answer is in the sky, not in more effort or more determination or more willpower. Look up, not around. Look deep, not shallow. Look long, not short. Signs are calling your name.


The trappings of national religion don’t seem quite right for the sovereign we await, who arrives as a vulnerable child, who will die at the hands of the State.


Sometimes I think Christian life consists not so much in right thinking and good deeds, but in a flustered objection to divine humility and a daily consent to the unthinkable.


Don’t fall for the divine, dual-personality theory about God and the Bible. God is both gracious and wrathful, and we need God’s wrath as much as we need God’s grace.


When Jesus said, “Do not store up treasures on earth,” I don’t think he wasn’t talking about people who live on little. Jesus was talking to the pampered people, like me.


Many of us could use more sleep. Maybe Jesus teaches us to be faithful nappers, so confident and well-rested in divine presence that we are not sunk by every crisis that assails us.